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Translation of "shuffle" - English-Spanish dictionary

shuffle

verb   /ˈʃʌf.l̩/
to walk by pulling your feet slowly along the ground rather than lifting them andar arrastrando los pies I love shuffling through the fallen leaves. He shuffled into the kitchen, leaning on his walking stick. Don’t shuffle your feet like that! Walk normally.1609
to move your feet or bottom around, while staying in the same place, especially because you are uncomfortable, nervous, or embarrassed arrastrar, revolverse The woman in front of me kept shuffling around in her seat all the way through the performance. When I asked him where he’d been, he just looked at the ground and shuffled his feet.1609
to move similar things from one position or place to another, often to give an appearance of activity when nothing useful is being done mezclar She shuffled her papers nervously on her desk. Many prisoners have to be shuffled around police stations because of prison overcrowding.16371913
to mix a set of playing cards without seeing their values before beginning a game, so that their order is not known to any of the players barajar It’s your turn to shuffle the cards.1489
→  Idioms shuffle off this mortal coil →  Phrasal verbs shuffle sth off
(Definition of shuffle from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

shuffle

verb /ˈʃafl/
to move (one’s feet) along the ground etc without lifting them caminar arrastrando los pies Do stop shuffling (your feet)! The old man shuffled along the street.
to mix (playing-cards etc) barajar It’s your turn to shuffle (the cards).
(Definition of shuffle from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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