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Translation of "stage" - English-Spanish dictionary

stage

noun /steidʒ/
a raised platform especially for performing or acting on, eg in a theatre/theater. escenario The actors had already assembled on the stage ready for the curtain to go up.
staging noun
wooden planks etc forming a platform. andamiaje
the way in which a play etc is presented on a stage puesta en escena The staging was good, but the acting poor.
stage direction noun
an order to an actor playing a part to do this or that acotación escénica a stage direction to enter from the left.
stage fright noun
the nervousness felt by an actor etc when in front of an audience, especially for the first time miedo escénico The young actress was suffering from stage fright and could not utter a word.
stagehand noun
a workman employed to help with scenery etc. tramoyista
stage manager noun
a person who is in charge of scenery and equipment for plays etc. director de escena
stagestruck adjective
fascinated with the theatre/theater or having a great desire to become an actor/actress con aspiraciones teatrales She had been stagestruck from a very early age.
Translations of “stage”
in Arabic خَشَبة المَسْرَح, مَرْحَلة…
in Korean 무대, 단계…
in Malaysian pentas…
in French scène…
in Turkish evre, aşama, safha…
in Italian palcoscenico, fase, stadio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 部分, 階段, 發展時期…
in Russian этап, стадия, фаза…
in Polish etap, faza, scena…
in Vietnamese sân khấu…
in Portuguese palco, estágio…
in Thai เวที…
in German die Bühne…
in Catalan escenari, etapa…
in Japanese 舞台, ステージ, 段階…
in Indonesian pentas…
in Chinese (Simplified) 部分, 阶段, 发展时期…
(Definition of stage from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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