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Spanish translation of “tolerate”

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tolerate

verb /ˈtoləreit/
to bear or endure; to put up with
tolerar
I couldn’t tolerate his rudeness.
tolerable adjective able to be borne or endured
tolerable
The heat was barely tolerable.
quite good
pasable
The food was tolerable.
tolerance noun the ability to be fair and understanding to people whose ways, opinions etc are different from one’s own
tolerancia
We should always try to show tolerance to other people.
the ability to resist the effects of eg a drug
tolerancia
If you take a drug regularly, your body gradually acquires a tolerance of it.
tolerant adjective showing tolerance
tolerante
He’s very tolerant towards his neighbours.
tolerantly adverb
con tolerancia, tolerantemente
He has to learn to behave more tolerantly towards other people.
toleration noun the act of tolerating
tolerancia
His toleration of her behaviour amazed me.
tolerance, especially in religious matters
tolerancia
The government passed a law of religious toleration.
Translations of “tolerate”
in Korean 참다, 용인하다…
in Arabic يَتسامَح…
in French tolérer…
in Italian tollerare…
in Chinese (Traditional) 接受, 寬容, 忍受…
in Russian терпеть, выносить, выдерживать…
in Turkish katlanmak, hoşgörmek, tolere etmek…
in Polish tolerować, znosić…
in Portuguese tolerar…
in German erträglich…
in Catalan tolerar…
in Japanese ~を容認する, 我慢する…
in Chinese (Simplified) 接受, 宽容, 忍受…
(Definition of tolerate from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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