Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Spanish translation of “value”

See all translations

value

noun /ˈvӕljuː/
worth, importance or usefulness
valor, importancia
His specialist knowledge was of great value during the project She places little value on material wealth.
price
valor
What is the value of that stamp?
purchasing power
valor
Are those old coins of any value?
fairness of exchange (for one’s money etc)
precio, valor
You get good value for money at that supermarket.
the length of a musical note.
valor
valuable adjective having high value
valioso
a valuable antique clock.
valuables noun plural things of special value
objetos valiosos
She keeps her jewellery and other valuables in a locked drawer.
valued adjective regarded as valuable or precious
valioso, precioso
What is your most valued possession?
valueless adjective having no value; worthless
sin valor
The necklace is completely valueless.
values noun plural standards or principles
valores
People have very different moral values.
value-added tax noun (abbreviation VAT) a tax that is imposed on goods and services.
impuesto sobre el valor añadido
Translations of “value”
in Korean (가격) 가치, (중요성) 가치…
in Arabic قيمة, فائدة…
in French valeur, utilité, achat avantageux…
in Italian valore…
in Chinese (Traditional) 錢, 價值, 價格…
in Russian цена, стоимость, ценность…
in Turkish değer, kıymet, eder…
in Polish wartość…
in Portuguese valor…
in German der Wert, die Qualitätsware, der Notenwert…
in Catalan valor…
in Japanese 値段, 価値…
in Chinese (Simplified) 钱, 价值, 价格…
(Definition of value from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “value” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

work out

to exercise in order to improve the strength or appearance of your body

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Read More