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Spanish translation of “wild”

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wild

adjective /waild/
(of animals) not tamed
salvaje, bravío
Wolves and other wild animals live in the forest.
(of land) not cultivated.
agreste, salvaje
uncivilized or lawless; savage
salvaje
wild tribes.
very stormy; violent
furioso, borrascoso
a wild night at sea a wild rage.
mad, crazy, insane etc
loco, alocado
They were wild with hunger He was wild with anxiety.
rash
disparatado, descabellado, desorbitado, alocado
a wild hope.
not accurate or reliable
precipitado, impetuoso
a wild guess.
very angry
furioso, colérico, frenético
He went wild when he discovered what his son had been doing.
wildly adverb
salvajemente, furiosamente, locamente
His shot was wildly inaccurate.
wildness noun
estado salvaje, furia, desenfreno, extravagancia
wildfire: spread like wildfire (of eg news) to spread extremely fast
correr/esparcirse como un reguero de pólvora
The rumour spread like wildfire through the town.
wildfowl noun plural wild birds, especially water birds such as ducks, geese etc.
ave de caza
wild-goose chase noun an attempt to catch or find something one cannot possibly obtain
búsqueda inútil
They sent us on a wild-goose chase.
wildlife noun wild animals, birds, insects etc collectively We must do everything we can to protect the local wildlife. in the wild (of an animal) in its natural surroundings
en estado salvaje
Young animals have to learn to look after themselves in the wild.
the wilds noun plural the uncultivated areas (of a country etc)
las regiones salvajes
They’re living out in the wilds of Australia somewhere.
(Definition of wild from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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