Meaning of "so" in Essential American English Dictionary

so

adverb us /soʊ/

A2 used before an adjective or adverb to make that adjective or adverb stronger:

I was so tired when I got home.
I love her so much.
I was so upset that I couldn’t speak.

A2 used to give a short answer to a question to avoid repeating a phrase:

“Is Ben coming to the party?” “I hope so.”

A2 used at the beginning of a sentence to connect it with something that was said or happened previously:

So, here we are again.
and so on

A2 used after a list of things to show that you could add other similar things:

I want to buy postcards, souvenirs, and so on.
or so

B1 used after a number or amount to show that it is not exact:

“How many people were at the party?” “Fifty or so, I guess.”
So (what)?

used to say that you do not think something is important, especially in a rude way:

“She might tell Emily.” “So what?”
so did we, so have I, so is mine, etc.

B1 used to say that someone else also does something or that the same thing is true about someone or something else:

She likes football and so do I.

(Definition of “so adverb” from the Webster's Essential Mini Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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