do verb Meaning in the Cambridge Essential English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of "do" in Essential English Dictionary

do

verb   /duː/ (doing, did, done)
A1 to perform an action: Go upstairs and do your homework.
A1 to perform a type of exercise or activity: She does yoga three times a week.
A2 to make or prepare something: Max’s Café does great sandwiches.
A2 used for talking or asking about how healthy, happy, or successful someone is: “How is your niece doing?” “She’s doing really well, thanks.”
A1 to study a subject: Diana did history at university.
do the cleaning, cooking, etc.
A1 to perform a job in the house: I do the cooking, but Joe does most of the cleaning.
what does someone do?
A1 used to ask what someone’s job is: “What do you do?” “I’m a doctor.”
do badly/well
B1 to not succeed, or to succeed: Sam did very well in his exam.
do your hair, make-up, etc.
B1 to make your hair, make-up, etc. look nice: It takes him half an hour to do his hair in the morning.
do your hair, makeup, etc.
to make your hair, makeup, etc. look nice: I need to do my hair before we go out.
be/have to do with something
to be related to something: She lacks confidence and I think that has to do with her childhood.
have to do with something
to be related to something: Our profits are down, which has to do with poor sales.
do someone good
to have a good effect on someone: A holiday would do you good.
will do
will be satisfactory: You don’t have to pay now. Next week will do.
could do with someone or something
to need or want someone or something: I could do with a few days off work.
(Definition of do verb from the Cambridge Essential Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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