change noun Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary
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Meaning of “change” - Learner’s Dictionary

change

noun
 
 
/tʃeɪndʒ/
DIFFERENCE [C, U] A2 a situation in which something becomes different, or the result of something becoming different: We need to make a few changes to the design. There is no change in the patient's condition (= the illness has not got better or worse). How can we bring about social change?Change and changes
FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER [C, U] A2 a situation in which you stop having or using one thing and start having or using another: This country needs a change of government. I've notified the school of our change of address.Change and changes
NEW EXPERIENCE [C] B1 something that you enjoy because it is a new experience: [usually singular] Going abroad for our anniversary would make a lovely change. It's nice to eat together as a family for a change.Change and changes
MONEY [U] A2 the money that you get back when you pay more for something than it costs: There's your receipt and £3 change.Forms of money and methods of payment
COINS [U] A2 coins, not paper money: Do you have any change for the parking meter? Have you got change for £5 (= can you give me £5 in coins in return for paper money)?Forms of money and methods of payment
a change of clothes A2 a set of clean clothes that you can put on if you need to take off the ones you are wearingPutting clothes onClothing - general words
→  See also small change , a change of heart
(Definition of change noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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