course - definition in the Learner's Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “course”

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course

noun
 
 
/kɔːs/
of course A1 used to say 'yes' and emphasize your answer: "Can you help me?" "Of course!"Yes, no and notIntensifying expressionsStressing and emphasizing B1 used to show that what you are saying is obvious or already known: The rain meant, of course, that the barbecue was cancelled. Of course, the Olympics are not just about money.Apparent and obviousVisible
of course not A2 used to say 'no' and emphasize your answer: "Do you mind if I borrow your pen?" "Of course not."Yes, no and not
LESSONS [C] A1 a series of lessons about a particular subject: She did a ten-week course in computing.Classes, courses and coursework
PART OF MEAL [C] A2 a part of a meal: a three-course dinnerMeals and parts of meals
SPORT [C] B1 an area used for horse races or playing golf: a golf courseSurfaces on which sports take place
MEDICINE [C] mainly UK a fixed number of regular medical treatments: a course of antibioticsMedicine in different forms
ROUTE [C, U] the direction in which a ship, aircraft, etc is moving: During the storm, the boat was blown off course (= in the wrong direction).Direction of motionPoints of the compass
ACTION [C] ( also course of action,
 
 
)
something that you can do in a particular situation: I think the best course of action would be to write to him.Ways of achieving things
during/in/over the course of sth during a particular time or activity: In the course of the interview she mentioned her previous experience.Simultaneous and consecutiveOrder and sequence
in due course B2 at a suitable time in the future: The results will be sent to you in due course.In the future and soon
DEVELOPMENT [no plural] the way something develops, usually over a long time: Nuclear weapons have changed the course of modern history.Ways of achieving things
in the course of time UK gradually, or over a period of time: His English will improve in the course of time.Spending time and time passing
be on course for sth/to do sth UK to be very likely to succeed at somethingMaking progress and advancingBecoming better
run its course If something runs its course, it continues naturally until it has finished. →  See also be on a collision course , crash course , be par for the course Coming to an endCausing something to end
(Definition of course from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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