fly verb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “fly” - Learner’s Dictionary

fly

verb     /flaɪ/ ( past tense flew, past participle flown)
MOVE THROUGH AIR [I] A2 When a bird, insect, aircraft, etc flies, it moves through the air: The robin flew up into a tree. The plane was flying at 5000 feet.Movement through the airAviationTravelling by aircraftTravelling by aircraftAviationMovement through the air
TRAVEL [I] A1 to travel through the air in an aircraft: I'm flying to Delhi tomorrow.Movement through the airAviationTravelling by aircraftTravelling by aircraftAviationMovement through the air
CONTROL AIRCRAFT [I, T] B2 to control an aircraft: She learned to fly at the age of 18.Travelling by aircraftAviationMovement through the air
TAKE/SEND [T] to take or send people or goods somewhere by aircraft: [often passive] She was flown to the hospital by helicopter.Travelling by aircraftAviationMovement through the air
fly along/down/past, etc to move somewhere very quickly: He grabbed some clothes and flew down the stairs.Moving quickly
send sb/sth flying to cause someone or something to move through the air suddenly, usually in an accidentMovement through the airAviationTravelling by aircraft
LEAVE [I] UK to leave suddenly: I must fly - I'm late for work.Moving quickly
let fly (at sb/sth) mainly UK informal to start shouting angrily or attacking someonePhysical and sexual assault and abductionSexual activity in generalAttacking and invadingShouting and screaming
TIME [I] If time flies, it passes very quickly.Spending time and time passing
FLAG [I, T] If you fly a flag, or a flag is flying, it is fixed to a rope or pole and raised in the air.Shaking, swinging and vibrating
flying noun [U] Ben's afraid of flying. →  See also as the crow flies , fly off the handle , fly about/around , fly into a rage/temper
(Definition of fly verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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