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English definition of “just”

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just

adverb
 
 
strong /dʒʌst/ weak /dʒəst/
ONLY B1 only: I'll just have a small piece. He just wants to win. The film is not just about love.Merely and barelyAlmost
RECENTLY A2 a very short time ago: I've just been on a trip to France. We've only just begun.In the past
EMPHASIS B1 used to emphasize something you say: I just can't bear it!Very and extremeComplete and wholeIntensifying expressions
ALMOST NOT UK B1 almost not: This dress only just fits.Merely and barelyAlmost
EXACTLY B1 exactly: Tim looks just like his father. This carpet would be just right for my bedroom.Accurate and exact
ALMOST NOW A2 now or very soon: The film is just beginning. I'm just coming!NowIn the future and soon
just before/over/under, etc B1 a little before/over/under, etc something else: It costs just over $10. She left just before Michael.Small in number and quantity
just about B1 almost: I think I've remembered just about everything.AlmostMerely and barely
be just about to do sth B1 to be going to do something very soon: I was just about to phone you.In the future and soon
just as bad/good/tall, etc (as sb/sth) B1 equally bad/good/tall, etc: He's just as talented as his brother.Similar and the sameDescribing people with the same qualities
I/you/we, etc will just have to do sth used to say that there is nothing else someone can do: You'll just have to wait.Inevitable
just as B2 at the same time as: She woke up just as we got there.Simultaneous and consecutiveOrder and sequence
it's just as well used to say that it is lucky that something happened: It's just as well we brought an umbrella. →  See also just the job Good luck and bad luck
(Definition of just adverb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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