lead verb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Meaning of “lead” - Learner’s Dictionary


/liːd/ ( past tense and past participle led /led/)
TAKE SOMEONE [I, T] B1 to show someone where to go, usually by taking them to a place or by going in front of them: She led them down the hall. We followed a path that led us up the mountain. You lead and we'll follow. I'll lead the way (= go first to show the route).Taking someone somewhere or telling them the way
lead into/to/towards, etc B2 If a path or road leads somewhere, it goes there: That path leads to the beach.Routes and roads in general
BE WINNING [I, T] B2 to be winning a game: They were leading by 11 points at half-time. The Lions lead the Hawks 28-9.Scoring, winning and losing in sportWinning and defeatingLosing and being defeated
BE THE BEST [T] to be better than anyone else: I still believe that we lead the world in acting talent.Extremely good
CONTROL [T] to be in control of a group, country, or situation: to lead a discussion Is this man really capable of leading the country? Casillas led his team to victory.Controlling and being in chargeRuling and governing
lead sb to do sth to make someone do or think something: What led you to think that? I was led to believe that breakfast was included.Affecting and influencing
lead a busy/normal/quiet, etc life B2 to live in a particular way: He was able to lead a normal life despite his illness.Lifestyles and their studyLife and living
lead sb to a conclusion to make you think that something is probably true: So you thought I was leaving, did you? What led you to that conclusion?Concluding and deducing
(Definition of lead verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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