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Meaning of “lead” - Learner’s Dictionary

lead

noun     /liːd/
WINNING [no plural]
B2 a winning position during a race or other situation where people are competing: She's in the lead (= winning). France has just taken the lead (= started to win). a three-goal leadScoring, winning and losing in sportWinning and defeatingLosing and being defeated
FILM/PLAY [C]
the main person in a film or play: She plays the lead in both movies.Casting, roles and scriptsCharacters in literature and film
DOG [C] UK ( US leash)
a chain or piece of leather fixed to a dog's collar so that it can be controlled: Dogs must be kept on a lead at all times.Fastening and tying
ELECTRICITY [C] UK ( US cord)
the wire that connects a piece of electrical equipment to the electricity supplyElectrical components and circuitryFastening and tying
INFORMATION [C]
information about a crime that police are trying to solve: Police are chasing up a new lead.Information and messages
(Definition of lead noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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