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Meaning of “let” - Learner’s Dictionary

let

verb [T]     /let/ ( present participle letting, past tense and past participle let)
ALLOW
B1 to allow someone to do something, or to allow something to happen: Let them play outside. Don't let the camera get wet. It's best to let nature take its course. We let a whole year go by before we tried again.Allowing and permitting
let sb/sth in/past/through, etc
B2 to allow someone or something to move to a particular place: They won't let us past the gate. I won't let him near my children. The roof lets in a lot of rain.Allowing and permittingGeneral words for movement
let's
A2 something that you say when you are making a suggestion: Let's eat out tonight. Let's not bother with the washing-up.Suggestions and proposals
let me/us
something that you say when you are offering to help someone: Let me carry your cases.Polite expressionsHelping and co-operating
BUILDING
If you let a building or part of a building, you allow someone to live there and they give you money: I let the top floor of my house to a student.Mortgages and real estateRenting, hiring and hire purchase in general Renting propertyRenting propertyMortgages and real estateRenting, hiring and hire purchase in general
Let's see/Let me see
something that you say when you are trying to remember something or calculate something: Let's see - there are five people and only three beds. It must have been - let me see - three years ago.InterjectionsSounds used as interjections
Let's say
something that you say when you are suggesting a possible situation or action: Let's say you manage to sell half the books. Let's say we'll meet back here in an hour.Suggestions and proposals
let sb know (sth)
A2 to tell someone something: [+ question word] I'll let you know when we've fixed a date for the meeting.Announcing, informing and stating
let (sth) go
to stop holding something: I let go of the rope. You have to let the handle go.Falling and droppingMoving downwards
let yourself go
to allow yourself to become less attractive or healthy: It's easy to let yourself go when you're pregnant.Deteriorating and making worse
to relax completely and enjoy yourself: It's a party - let yourself go!Calming and relaxing
let's face it
something that you say when the truth is unpleasant but must be accepted: Let's face it, we're not getting any younger.Honesty, openness and sincerity
→  See also let the cat out of the bag , let your hair down , get/let sb off the hook , let off steam , let alone , let sb down , let sb in , let yourself in for sth , let sb off , let on , let sb/sth out , let up
(Definition of let from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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