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Meaning of “life” - Learner’s Dictionary

life

noun     /laɪf/ ( plural lives /laɪvz/)
ANIMALS/PLANTS [U]
B1 living things and their activities: human/marine life Is there life in outer space?Life and living
PERSON'S EXISTENCE [C]
B2 the existence of a person: How many lives will be lost to AIDS?Life and living
TIME [C, U]
A1 the time between a person's birth and their death: I'm not sure I want to spend the rest of my life with him. Life's too short to worry about stuff like that. Unfortunately, accidents are part of life. He had a happy life.Life and living
WAY OF LIVING [C, U]
B1 a way of living: You lead an exciting life.Lifestyles and their study
family/private/sex, etc life
B1 one part of someone's existence: My private life is nobody's business but mine.
ACTIVITY [U]
B2 energy and activity: She was always bubbly and full of life. I looked through the window but couldn't see any signs of life (= people moving).Energetic and lively
ACTIVE PERIOD [no plural]
the amount of time that a machine, system, etc exists or can be used: Careful use will prolong the life of your machine.Periods of time - general words
→  See also the facts of life , give sb the kiss of life , give sb/sth a new lease of life , shelf life , walk of life , bring sth to life/come to life , That's life. , Get a life!
(Definition of life from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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