mad Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary
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Meaning of “mad” - Learner’s Dictionary

mad

adjective
 
 
/mæd/
CRAZY mainly UK informal B1 stupid or crazy: [+ to do sth] You're mad to walk home alone at night.Of unsound mindStupid and silly
ANGRY A2 mainly US angry: Were your parents mad at you when you came home late?Angry and displeasedBad-tempered
go mad UK to become very angry: Dad'll go mad when he finds out you took the car.Becoming angry and expressing anger to suddenly become very excited: When the band arrived on stage, the crowd went mad.Excited, interested and enthusiastic
be mad about sb/sth informal B1 to love someone or something: She's mad about Hugh Grant. Jo's mad about skiing.Loving and in love
SICK mainly UK B1 mentally illMental and psychiatric disordersOf unsound mindStupid and silly
NOT CONTROLLED not controlled: We made a mad dash for the exit.Mental and psychiatric disordersUncontrolledEnergetic and lively
like mad B2 If you run, work, etc like mad, you do it very quickly and with a lot of energy.Fast and rapidShort in time B2 If something hurts like mad, it hurts a lot.Pain and painfulIntensifying expressions
(Definition of mad from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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