see Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Meaning of “see” - Learner’s Dictionary


/siː/ ( present participle seeing, past tense saw, past participle seen)
EYES [I, T] A1 to notice people and things with your eyes: Have you seen Jo? Turn the light on so I can see.Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptive
UNDERSTAND [I, T] B1 to understand something: I see what you mean. I don't see why I should go.Understanding and comprehending
MEET [T] A1 to meet or visit someone: I'm seeing Peter tonight. You should see a doctor.Meeting peopleOfficial meetingsVisiting
WATCH [T] A2 to watch a film, television programme, etc: Did you see that programme last night?Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptive
INFORMATION [T] B1 to find out information: [+ question word] I'll just see what time the train gets in.Finding and discovering
IMAGINE [T] B2 to imagine or think about something or someone in a particular way: I just can't see him as a father.Imagining and conceiving
BELIEVE [T] to believe that something will happen: I can't see us finishing on time.Predicting things and intuition
HAPPEN [T] to be the time or place where something happens: This decade has seen huge technological advances.Occurring and happening
see that If you ask someone to see that something happens, you want them to make sure it happens: Could you see that everyone gets a copy of this letter?Planning, expecting and arrangingPlotting and trappingWanting everything to be right
see sb home/to the station, etc to go somewhere with someone, especially to make sure they are safe: Let me see you home.Taking someone somewhere or telling them the way
I'll/we'll see used to say that you will make a decision about something later: "Dad, can I have a guitar?" "We'll see."Delaying and wasting time
see you informal A1 used for saying goodbye →  See also be glad/happy, etc to see the back of sb/sth , see eye to eye (with sb) , see red Welcoming, greeting and greetings
(Definition of see from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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