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English definition of “start”

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start

verb
 
 
/stɑːt/
BEGIN DOING [I, T] A1 to begin doing something: [+ doing sth] He started smoking when he was eighteen. [+ to do sth] Maria started to laugh. We start work at nine o'clock.Starting and beginningStarting again
BEGIN HAPPENING [I, T] B1 to begin to happen or to make something begin to happen: The programme starts at seven o'clock. Police believe the fire started in the kitchen.Starting and beginningStarting againCausing things to happen
BUSINESS [I, T] ( also start up) B2 If a business, organization, etc starts, it begins to exist, and if you start it, you make it begin to exist: She started her own computer business. A lot of new restaurants have started up in the area.Starting, succeeding and failing in business
CAR [I, T] ( also start up) B2 If a car or engine starts, it begins to work, and if you start it, you make it begin to work: The car won't start. Start up the engine.Starting and beginningStarting againFunctioningPerforming a function
to start with used to talk about what a situation was like at the beginning before it changed: I was happy at school to start with, but later I hated it.Starting and beginningStarting again used before saying the first thing in a list of things: To start with, we need better computers. Then we need more training.First and firstly
MOVE SUDDENLY [I] to move suddenly because you are frightened or surprised →  See also set/start the ball rolling , get/start off on the wrong foot Making short, sudden movements
(Definition of start verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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