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Meaning of “take” - Learner’s Dictionary

take

verb [T]     /teɪk/ ( past tense took, past participle taken)
CARRY
A1 to get and carry something with you when you go somewhere: I always take my mobile phone with me.Taking and choosingTransferring and transporting objectsDelivering and despatching
GO
A1 to go somewhere with someone, often paying for them or being responsible for them: I took the kids to the park. I'm taking my wife to Florence for the weekend.Taking someone somewhere or telling them the way
WITHOUT PERMISSION
B1 to remove something without permission: Someone's taken my coat.Taking and choosingCapturing or taking possession of thingsGetting, receiving and accepting
GET HOLD
B1 to get hold of something and move it: He reached across and took the glass from her.Taking and choosingTransferring and transporting objectsHaving in your hands
ACCEPT
B1 to accept something: So, are you going to take the job? Do you take credit cards?Getting, receiving and acceptingCapturing or taking possession of things
NEED
A2 If something takes a particular amount of time, or a particular quality, you need that amount of time or that quality in order to be able to do it: [+ to do sth] It's taken me three days to get here. It takes a lot of courage to stand up and talk in front of so many people.Essential or necessary
MEDICINE
A2 to swallow or use medicine: Take two tablets, three times a day.Administering drugs and medicines
MEASURE
to measure something: Have you taken her temperature?Weighing and measuring
CLOTHES
B1 to wear a particular size of clothes: I take a size 12 in trousers.Not wearing or removing clothes
SPACE
to have enough space for a particular number of people or things: There's six of us and the car only takes five.Area, mass, weight and volume in general
TRAVEL
A2 to travel somewhere by using a bus, train, car, etc, or by using a particular road: Are you taking the train to Edinburgh? Take the A316 towards Richmond.Travelling
take a break/rest, etc
B1 to stop working for a period: If you're tired, take a rest.Time off work
take pleasure/pride/an interest, etc
B2 to have a particular, good feeling about something that you do: I take great pleasure in cooking. These women take their jobs very seriously (= think their jobs are very important).Feelings - general words
take a look
B1 to look at something: Take a look at these photos.Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptive
UNDERSTAND
to understand something in a particular way: Whatever I say she'll take it the wrong way.Understanding and comprehending
I take it (that)
used when you think that what you say is probably true: I take it you're not coming with us.Guesses and assumptions
can't take sth
B2 to not be able to deal with an unpleasant situation: We argue all the time - I really can't take it any more.Coping and not copingDealing with things or peopleTolerating and enduring
take it from me
accept that what I say is true, because I know or have experienced it: You could be doing a much less interesting job, take it from me.True, real, false, and unreal
take sth as it comes
to deal with something as it happens, without planning for it: With an illness like this you just have to take every day as it comes.Not expected or planned
BY FORCE
to get control of something by force: By morning they had taken the city.Taking and choosingCapturing or taking possession of thingsGetting, receiving and accepting
(Definition of take from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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