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Meaning of “treat” - Learner’s Dictionary

treat

verb [T]     /triːt/
DEAL WITH
B2 to behave towards or deal with someone in a particular way: He treats her really badly. She felt she'd been unfairly treated by her employer. They treat her like one of their own children.Behaving, interacting and behaviour
CONSIDER
B2 to consider something in a particular way: He treated my suggestion as a joke.Analysing and evaluatingAssessing and estimating valueOpinions, beliefs and points of view
ILLNESS/INJURY
B2 to give medical care to someone for an illness or injury: He's being treated for cancer at a hospital in California.Treating and caring for people
SPECIAL
B2 to do or buy something special for someone: I'm going to treat her to dinner at that nice Italian restaurant.Treating someone well
PROTECT
to put a substance on something in order to protect it: The wood is then treated with a special chemical to protect it from the rain.Covering and adding layersIndustry and industrial processes
(Definition of treat verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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