work verb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “work” - Learner’s Dictionary

work

verb     /wɜːk/
JOB [I, T]
A1 to do a job, especially the job you do to earn money: Helen works for a computer company. He works as a waiter in an Italian restaurant. My dad works very long hours (= he works a lot of hours).Work, working and the workplaceWorking hours and periods of work
MACHINE [I]
A2 If a machine or piece of equipment works, it is not broken: Does this radio work? The washing machine isn't working.FunctioningPerforming a function
SUCCEED [I]
B1 If something works, it is effective and successful: Her plan to get rid of me didn't work.Performing a functionFunctioningSuccessful (things or people)
can work sth; know how to work sth
to know how to use a machine or piece of equipment: Do you know how to work the dishwasher?FunctioningPerforming a functionUsing and misusing
EFFORT [I, T]
to do something that needs a lot of time or effort, or to make someone do this: [+ to do sth] He's been working to improve his speed. Our teacher works us very hard.Effort and expending energyTrying and making an effort
work your way around/through/up, etc sth
to achieve something gradually: I have a pile of homework to work my way through.Succeeding, achieving and fulfilling
(Definition of work verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

nutty

containing, tasting of, or similar to nuts

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More