have verb - İngilizce Türkçe Sözlükten Çeviri - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Turkish translation of “have”

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have

verb
 
 
strong /hæv/ weak /həv, əv, v/ ( past tense and past participle had)
OWN [T] ( also have got) A1 to own something
sahip olmak
I have two horses. Laura has got beautiful blue eyes.Having and owning - general words
HOLD [T] B1 used to say that someone is holding something, or that someone or something is with them
bir şeyi tuttuğunu veya bir şeyin birinin yanında olduğunu bildirmek için kullanılır
He had a pen in his hand. She had a baby with her.Having and owning - general words
BE ILL [T] ( also have got) A1 If you have a particular illness, you are suffering from it.
bir hastalığı olmak
Have you ever had the measles?Being and falling ill
EAT/DRINK [T] A1 to eat or drink something
yemek, içmek
We are having dinner at 7 o'clock. Can I have a drink of water?EatingBiting, chewing and swallowingDrinking
have a bath/sleep/walk, etc A2 used with nouns to say that someone does something
duş almak, uyku çekmek, yürüyüş yapmak vb.
Can I have a quick shower? Let Mark have a try.Acting and actsDealing with things or people
have difficulty/fun/problems, etc A2 used with nouns to say that someone experiences something
zorluk çekmek, eğlenmek, sorunları olmak
We had a great time in Barcelona.Experiencing and suffering
have a baby A2 to give birth to a baby
çocuk doğurmak, bebek sahibi olmak
BirthPregnancy
have sth done B1 If you have something done, someone does it for you.
bir şeyi yaptırmak/ettirmek
I'm having my hair cut tomorrow. We had the carpets cleaned.Acting and actsDealing with things or peopleCausing things to happen
(Definition of have verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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