last adjective, determiner translate to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Translation of "last" - English-Turkish dictionary

last

adjective, determiner     /lɑːst/
MOST RECENT [always before noun]
A2 the most recent en son, en sonuncu What was the last film you saw? It's rained for the last three days.Before, after and alreadyAfter and behind
ONE BEFORE PRESENT [always before noun]
A2 The last book, house, job, etc is the one before the present one. geçen, önceki I liked his last book but I'm not so keen on this latest one.Final and finallyIn the past
FINAL
A2 happening or coming at the end en son, son It's the last room on the left. That's the last programme of the series. I was the last one to arrive. "How did she get on in her race?" "She was last."Final and finally
REMAINING [always before noun]
B1 only remaining en son, sonuncusu Who wants the last piece of cake?Things remaining
the last person/thing, etc
B2 the least expected or wanted person or thing beklenen en son kişi/şey vb. Three extra people to feed - that's the last thing I need! He's the last person you'd expect to see at an aerobics class. →  Opposite first adjective →  See also be on its last legs , the final/last straw , have the last word Unsuitable and unacceptable
(Definition of last adjective, determiner from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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