outlet translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "outlet" - English-Turkish dictionary

outlet

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈaʊtlet/
SHOP In business, an outlet is a shop that sells one type of product or the products of one company.
tek tip ürüne dayalı fabrika satış mağazası
Shops, markets and auctionsRestaurants and cafesBuildings in general
CHEAP SHOP US a shop that sells goods for a lower price than usual
indirim mağazası
Shops, markets and auctionsRestaurants and cafesBuildings in general
EXPRESS a way for someone to express an emotion, idea, or ability
gösterecek/çıkış olabilecek olan şey; kindini/fikirlerini/duygularını anlatma/ifade etme
She needs a job that will provide an outlet for her creative talent.Opportunity Freedom to act
WAY OUT a place where a liquid or gas can flow out of something
çıkış yeri, delik, ağız
Plumbing and pipes and sewageMovement of liquids
CONNECTION US a place where you can connect a wire on a piece of electrical equipment
elektrik prizi; fişin takıldığı yer
an electrical outletElectrical switches and connections
(Definition of outlet from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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