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Translation of "passage" - English-Turkish dictionary

passage

noun     /ˈpæsɪdʒ/
SPACE [C] ( also passageway,     /ˈpæsɪdzweɪ/)
B2 a long, narrow space that connects one place to another geçit, dehliz There's a passage to the side of the house, leading to the garden.Passages and entrance areas
WRITING/MUSIC [C]
B2 a short part of a book, speech, or piece of music parça, bölüm, pasaj She can quote whole passages from the novel.Musical pieces
TUBE [C]
a tube in your body that allows air, liquid, etc to pass through it yol, kanal, tüp the nasal/respiratory passagesSubstances and structures in the body
PROGRESS [U, no plural]
the movement or progress from one stage or place to another geçiş, ilerleme It's a difficult passage from boyhood to manhood.Journeys
the passage of time literary
the way that time passes geçiş, akış, ilerleyiş Love changes with the passage of time.Spending time and time passing
(Definition of passage from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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