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Turkish translation of “right”

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right

adverb
 
 
/raɪt/
EXACTLY B1 exactly in a place or time
tam, tamı tamına
He's right here with me. I fell asleep right in the middle of her speech.Accurate and exact
CORRECTLY B2 correctly
doğru olarak, tam olarak, doğru şekilde
He guessed right most of the time.FunctioningPerforming a function
DIRECTION A2 to the right side
sağ tarafa, sağ tarafta
Turn right after the bridge.General location and orientation
right away/now/after B1 immediately
derhal, hemen, şimdi, çarçabuk, vakit geçirmeden
Do you want to start right away?Immediately
ALL all the way
tamamen, bütünüyle
Did you read it right through to the end?Complete and wholeVery and extreme
IN SPEECH UK A2 used at the beginning of a sentence to get someone's attention or to show you have understood someone
peki, tamam, pekâla, oldu
Right, who's turn is it to tidy up? Right, so Helen's coming tomorrow and Trevor on Thursday.Connecting words joining words or phrases with similar or related meanings
Right used in the UK as part of the title of some politicians and Christian officials
Saygın, Saygıdeğer
Right Honourable/ReverendNames and titlesGovernment ministers and civil servantsReligious titles
rightness noun [U]
doğruluk
→  See also be right up sb's alley , be right up sb's street
(Definition of right adverb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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