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Translation of "set" - English-Turkish dictionary

set

noun [C]     /set/
GROUP
A2 a group of things which belong together set, takım a set of instructions/rules a set of keys/toolsGroups and collections of thingsVariety and mixturesNumerical relationships
FILM/PLAY
B2 the place where a film or play is performed or recorded, and the pictures, furniture, etc that are used set, dekor, sahne They first met on the set of 'Star Wars'.Theatres, cinemas and their partsProduction, direction and recording
TENNIS
B2 one part of a tennis match tenis maçında set Agassi is leading by four games to one in the third set.Tennis and racket sports
TV/RADIO
B1 a television or radio alıcı, cihaz a TV setTelevision
MUSIC
a group of songs or tunes that go together to make a musical performance repertuar, müzik dinletisini oluşturan şarkılar Musical performances
MATHS
a group of numbers or thingsNumerical relationships
(Definition of set noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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