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Turkish translation of “stand”

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stand

noun
 
 
/stænd/
SHOP [C] a small shop with an open front or a table from which goods are sold
tezgâh, sergi, tabla, seyyar satıcı tezgâhı
a hot dog stand Visit our stand at the trade fair.Frames and structuresShops, markets and auctionsRestaurants and cafesBuildings in general
SPORT [C] UK ( US stands) a structure in a sports ground where people can stand or sit to watch an event
tribün
Sports venuesFrames and structures
FURNITURE [C] a piece of furniture for holding things
altlık, destek, sehpa, askı
a music/hat standFrames and structuresFurniture for storageFurniture and fittings - general words
the (witness) stand ( UK also the dock) the place in a law court where people sit or stand when they are being asked questions
tanık dinleme yeri
The judge asked her to take the stand (= go into the witness stand).Law courtsFrames and structures
OPINION [C] an opinion or belief about something, especially if you say it in public
genel görüş/fikir/düşünce/inanç
[usually singular] What's the President's stand on gun control?Opinions, beliefs and points of viewOpposing and against
take a stand to express your opinion about something publicly
açıkça fiirlerini belirtmek; tavır koymak
He refuses to take a stand on this issue.Opposing and againstExpressing and asking opinionsRemarks and remarkingControlling emotions
make a stand to publicly defend something or stop something from happening
ayak diremek, kafa tutmak, ulu orta desteklemek/engellemek
Refusing and rejectingOpposing and against
(Definition of stand noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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